As a commitment to diversifying the professoriate, University of Delaware is happy to offer several competitive English and History graduate applicants interested in interdisciplinary work in the Black public humanities five-year $25,000 fellowships with an additional $4,500 in summer funding, and extremely generous yearly  professional development funds for training in digital humanities and in archives, repositories and museums. Students will join a close community of dedicated students and also have the opportunity to work with the prize-winning Colored Conventions Project (ColoredConventions.org). We are developing a website that will soon be available, but we wanted to reach out to faculty colleagues and friends now and to ask you to encourage your best students of color to apply to UD.

University of Delaware has deep strengths in both its English and History departments with scholars who are also known for dedicated teaching and mentorship. John Ernest, Gabrielle Foreman, Erica Armstrong Dunbar, Tiffany Gill, Tanisha Ford, Laura Helton and Tim Spaulding are among them. Our strengths in American literature and material culture studies beyond Africana studies are also deep and strong. Martin Bruckner, Peter Feng, Laura Helton, David Kim, Ed Larkin, Jeannie Pfaelzer and Sarah Wasserman are all exciting scholars in American literary history and culture. And literary scholar Carol Henderson serves as Vice Provost.

UD also offers a graduate certificate and innovative offerings in Museum Studies.

Applications to the department of English are due January 1, 2017. Please have students indicate that they’re interested in the Black Public Humanities Ph.D program.

A note on Delaware. It’s directly mid-way between NYC and DC, close to Philadelphia and about an hour from Baltimore. In other words, Delaware sits in the middle of one of the most important cultural hubs of the world. Our students regularly go to exhibits and museums and hold internships in DC, NY and Philly. The cost of living is less expensive than many other metropolitan areas. Amtrak and regular bus routes makes getting to cities on the East Coast quite easy.

Please share widely and encourage your students to apply! Want more information? Please contact Professor Erica Armstrong Dunbar, Blue and Gold Professor of Black Studies and History, Director, PhD program in Black Public Humanities, at era@udel.edu, Gabrielle Foreman, the Co-PI, at gforeman@udel.edu or John Ernest, chair of the English department at jrernest@udel.edu.