BrANCA (the British Association of Nineteenth-Century Americanists) would like to publish materials for teaching nineteenth-century American literature in Britain on its website. Teaching nineteenth-century American literature in Britain involves particular opportunities and challenges. Students in the British education system may well encounter less American literature than textbook writers realise, especially in the wake of the government’s May 2014 decision to drop American texts from the GCSE curriculum (see Sue Currell’s post at https://www.baas.ac.uk/chairsreport2015/). The structure of the UK undergraduate curriculum is different than in the US, with fewer modules, fewer options, and more opportunities for a shared body of knowledge. Nineteenth-century American literary studies is not a static foundation for contemporary literature but a changing field, and conversations about teaching feed into research in many ways, such as by demonstrating the need for various types of publication.

Please send statements of research-led teaching of nineteenth-century American texts from any level of the university curriculum. In statements of up to two A4 pages (i.e. they can be very brief), please identify the module by institution, course of study, and module tutors, and include a list of literary texts and/or theoretical/critical readings. Narratives of pedagogical strategies that worked well for these materials are welcome. Modules may be focused on nineteenth-century US texts or put those texts in dialogue with literature from other periods or geographical locations.

Please send a Microsoft Word document (one per module) by 2 April 2016 to Stephanie Palmer (stephanie.palmer@ntu.ac.uk), Hilary Emmett (hilaryemmett@gmail.com), or J. Michelle Coghlan (j.michelle.coghlan@manchester.ac.uk).

For an exemplar, see the website: http://www.branca.org.uk/teaching-nineteenth-century-american-literature-in-britain.html