The Campaign of Miracles?

The week was undoubtedly marked by events of the Republican party. Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump were both victorious in Indiana, with 53% of the votes for each. Most of the attention of the columnists and commentators however, was directed to the GOP due to Ted Cruz and John Kasich announcing that they were pulling out of the race. Continue reading

There’s No Place like Home: Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump Conquered New York

19 April marked one of the most important events of the 2016 primary elections: the vote in New York State. The results did not dispute the previous day’s polls: Republican Donald Trump won by getting 60.5% of the votes (89 delegates), John Kasich received 25% of the votes (3 delegates), Ted Cruz, 14.5% and no delegates. For the Democrats, Hillary Clinton got 57.9% (139 delegates) and Bernie Sanders 42.1% (106 delegates). Continue reading

Go West: Bernie Sanders over-wins, but Trump is in the spotlight

The tragic events in Brussels on March 22 heavily influenced the public and political debate of the primaries, helping to soften much of the harsh criticisms and personal defamation which marked the previous few weeks. A truly intensive voting calendar characterized last week’s voting results: Arizona chose Hillary Clinton with 57.6% over Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump with 41% on March 22, reaffirming the latter’s usual gap over Cruz, who got 24.9%. It has to be said that the most significant electoral results got less attention than expected: Cruz won big in Utah disappointing Donald Trump, while Bernie Sanders got a striking double victory in Idaho as well, almost reaching 80% of the votes. Continue reading

“The show will go on”: the successes of Trump and Sanders push back the end of the primary elections

“Trump-phobia” looks like the skepticism that preceded the election of Ronald Reagan, once in office one of the most popular Presidents in the history of the country. However, the violence of the weekend cast doubts on the real capacity of Trump to reunify the country behind him if he will be elected as President in November. Continue reading

Results and Fallout from Super Tuesday and Super Saturday

U.S. Studies Online and the Centro Interuniversitario di Storia e Politica Euro-Americana (CISPEA) postgraduate group (www.ceraunavoltalamerica.it) are pleased to present a recurring summary of the key developments in the lead up to the US Presidential Election 2016. This post brings together leading media analysis reflecting on the continuing rise of Donald Trump and Republican disunity, Hillary Clinton’s success and Bernie Sanders’s determined fightback, and the results and fallout of both Super Tuesday and Super Saturday. Continue reading

Who’s Got the Power: Big Decisions Ahead of Super Tuesday

U.S. Studies Online and the Centro Interuniversitario di Storia e Politica Euro-Americana (CISPEA) postgraduate group (www.ceraunavoltalamerica.it) are pleased to present a recurring summary of the key developments in the lead up to the US Presidential Election 2016. This post brings together leading media analysis following Hillary Clinton’s narrow victory in Nevada, Donald Trump’s latest success in South Carolina, and Jeb Bush’s withdrawal from the White House race, and looks ahead to the battle royale that is Super Tuesday (March 1). Continue reading

Idealist or not? Hamlet 2.0: New Hampshire election results

The Primaries in New Hampshire ended with victories for Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump. The former closed with a clear lead of 22 points over Hillary Clinton, while Trump left behind the uncertain John Kasich, with a 20% advantage. U.S. Studies Online and the Italian Association for North American Studies postgraduate group (www.ceraunavoltalamerica.it) present a summary of key developments and reflections following the latest events in the race to the White House. Continue reading

Feel the Bern, find the Cruz: Iowa election results

On the 1st of February, the American electoral machine was officially set in motion with caucuses in Iowa.

Both the Cruz victory and the Sanders’s arguable success are indicators of a polarization inside the American electorate, characterized by anti-politics and anti-establishment trends. Continue reading